Nativism Watch

White nationalist Jared Taylor has a message for Iowans: ‘Vote Trump’


Imagine2050 Staff • Jan 11, 2016
Jared Taylor is the founder of American Renaissance. Taylor, who tries to mask white nationalism as "racial realism," said in a January 2016 robocall to Iowans, "We don’t need Muslims. We need smart, well-educated white people who will assimilate to our culture."
Jared Taylor is the founder of American Renaissance. Taylor, who tries to mask white nationalism as “racial realism,” said in a January 2016 robocall to Iowans, “We don’t need Muslims. We need smart, well-educated white people who will assimilate to our culture.”

White nationalists continue to make it clear that Donald Trump is their man in 2016.

As Talking Points Memo reported this weekend, prominent white nationalists including Jared Taylor have now launched robocalls in Iowa supporting the viciously nativist Republican front-runner’s campaign.

“I urge you to vote for Donald Trump because he is the one candidate who points out that we should accept immigrants who are good for America,” Jared Taylor says on the call. “We don’t need Muslims. We need smart, well-educated white people who will assimilate to our culture. Vote Trump.”

Taylor is the founder of the white nationalist New Century Foundation. Over the summer, he also served as spokesperson for the white supremacist Council of Conservative Citizens following the murder of nine parishioners at an historic African American church in Charleston, South Carolina.

The Iowa robocalls were paid for by American National Super PAC, a new campaign committee set up by white nationalist lawyer William Johnson. As the Southern Poverty Law Center notes, Johnson is also chairman of the white nationalist American Freedom Party and has called for the deportation of anyone with an “ascertainable trace of Negro blood” or more than one-eighth “Mongolian, Asian, Asia Minor, Middle Eastern, Semitic, Near Eastern, American Indian, Malay or other non-European or non-white blood.”

Records from the Federal Election Commission indicate that Johnson first attempted to register the new PAC in October 2015 under the name “American National Trump Super PAC.” The FEC denied Johnson’s initial application as the committee’s name included the name of a presidential candidate. Johnson submitted an amended committee name to the FEC in December.

As we have noted at Imagine 2050 previously, Donald Trump’s support among the nation’s leading white nationalists is not a new phenomenon. Active campaigns in support of the candidate, however, suggests that the devotion shown by these white nationalist leaders is more significant and substantial than the praise they offer in articles or interviews.

The robocalls currently making their way into homes across Iowa only reinforce this. Whether voters in other primary states will receive calls from Taylor and others at the American National Super PAC remains to be seen.

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